State Of Affairs

dresslikea:

The third and last set of pictures from Pitti Uomo (from day 2) courtesy of TSBmen and A&H Magazine, shot by Neil Watson.

Brown and blue and their different tones are maybe the most easy colors to combine together. The light and dark brown shades of brown in shoes and tie are here brought together with different tones of blue featured in the shirt, jacket, bag, pocket square and again in the shoes as contrasting color. As the fall comes and days get colder one might want to change the trousers to a bit more dark colored pair (as denim for example) but in the heat of 30°C there’s really no option that could compete with white cotton slacks.

Wearing - double-breasted, unlined checked blazer by Lardini - made-to-measure chambray shirt from Isaia Napoli - Cotton trousers by Berwich - brown herringbone patterned linen tie from Berg&Berg - Mismo tote bag - and suede loafers by Christian Kimber.

(via theartofthegentleman)

meninthistown:

I’m thrilled to announce that I’ll be celebrating the worldwide launch of the Men In This Town book in New York during fashion week! The Powerhouse Arena will be graciously hosting the event in Brooklyn on September 9th. So if you’re going to be in town, I would love to see you there! 
RSVP to RSVP@powerHouseArena.com

meninthistown:

I’m thrilled to announce that I’ll be celebrating the worldwide launch of the Men In This Town book in New York during fashion week! The Powerhouse Arena will be graciously hosting the event in Brooklyn on September 9th. So if you’re going to be in town, I would love to see you there! 

RSVP to RSVP@powerHouseArena.com

The Desktop: State of Affairs’ Kendrick Jackson

Kendrick Jackson resize-1

An office can tell you a lot about a creator, but in this case, we were first struck by Kendrick Jackson’s off-beat preppy look at WeWork Wonder Bread Factory.

Turns out, this modern day gentleman also has a beautiful office turned showroom that matches his dapper style. The managing partner of State of Affairs, a men’s custom clothier and lifestyle brand, describes the decor of his showroom as a “reflection of the company’s everyday lifestyle.”

Jackson and his team at State of Affairs has mastered showing off their wares in a cool, comfortable space so their clients can feel relaxed when they’re coming in for alterations or cocktail workshops.

We chatted with Jackson as part of The Desktop — a series that highlights interesting (and always inviting) offices at WeWork. Jackson shares where he draws inspiration from inside these glass walls.

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“We have made an effort to take one client at a time in the showroom. It’s important for them to see that their comfort comes before ours. We are proud to have a space that respects this philosophy.”

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“It’s important for us to have a functional and beautiful workspace because it plays a pivotal role in our company. It has to look great and be organized or it can quickly look cluttered. You want to showcase an item in the best light possible that will hopefully elevate your customer’s wardrobe.”

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“Brandon Andrew, a leading tech and policy advocate here in the District is one of our style icons. We also like Gianni Agnelli, a prominent automobile, industrial, and menswear enthusiast. I love that we are able to get inspiration from icons from the past and present. This really fits into our classic and modern approach to menswear.”

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They’re silk ties handmade in Como, Italy, and based out of Salt Lake City, Utah. Another favorite brand is General Knot & Co. It’s an Upstate New York brand that makes and designs everything here in the U.S., which has been a major selling point for our cost-conscious clients.”

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“In these days of content overload, a magazine like Monocle is in a league of its own. We love the in-depth articles and briefings from around the world, but we hate that it takes so long to finish an issue. Monocle has been a valued resource for us to update and inform our clients on various places to visit when we hear of their upcoming travels.”

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“The sketches are from our family and partners at A&H Magazine. They were sketches taken from photographs at the Pitti Uomo menswear trade show in Florence that occurs twice a year, every January and June. We also work closely with another traveling artist by the name of Sunflowerman, who is a contributor at Details magazine.”

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“The beer goblets compliment the amenities that WeWork provides. It’s only right to serve a beer in a proper glass rather than a plastic cup, especially to a gentleman who is about to make an investment in his wardrobe.”

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“Our concept is very simple. Scour the planet for the highest quality products at an accessible price. Clients can try on each item in our showroom and make an order in person or online. We can have any item shipped to them in three to 15 business days. This concept has been revolutionary for our business. We want to continue growing upward and onward, and we look forward to getting shit done.”

Photographs by Lauren Kallen

fastcompany:

America’s Oddly Beautiful Suburban Sprawl, Photographed From The Sky

Urban sprawl is the type of thing you tend to forget about if you’re living in it, except maybe when you’re stuck in traffic inching home after work. But it does a lot more than cause road rage: Sprawl also makes us fatter, sicker, and poorer, and it’s the source of half of the country’s household carbon footprint. In a series of photos taken over seven years, now published in a new book called Ciphers, photographer Christoph Gielen shows a different perspective on sprawl, intended to get more people to question typical patterns of development.

See More>

930club:

HOW DID I MISS THIS: Nickel Creek

Oh Nickel Creek, where have you been all my life? A hole in my repertoire I didn’t know existed, it’s no wonder that everyone freaked out when this band just went on tour for the first time in a decade. I was curious what all the hype was about and saw a violin in the press photo, so then promptly educated myself by listening to everything that Spotify would let me hear. Conclusion: Nickel Creek is one hell of a roots group! After that I forgot about the long overdue magic I had discovered, but fortunately one day I cut someone off mid conversation because I heard a really familiar sound on NPR, which I realized was Nickel Creek’s “Destination”- hence, my love for Nickel Creek was reignited and “Destination” was added to my running playlist. Nickel Creek, I’m so glad that you all are back, even though I didn’t know that you were gone in the first place.

-Emily Hirsch @emhirschybar

suitsandshirts:

How to fold a pocket square by Mr. Michael Hill. MR PORTER

fromsqualortoballer:

Out & About: The Alden Shop of San Francisco (170 Sutter St.)
There are quite a few clothing stores in downtown San Francisco. Some are common and approachable, like Uniqlo and Macy’s, while others like Nieman Marcus and Wilkes Bashford are only for the true ballers among us. Of course, it should come as no surprise that my favorite store is neither of these things - it is small, unassuming, and focused on doing just one thing but doing it well. It’s something surprisingly unique to the Bay Area, too - the Alden Shop of San Francisco.
I know what you’re thinking: “I thought Alden was a Massachusetts brand! It says ‘New England’ right there in the photo!” Well, you’re not wrong, but it’s a bit more complicated than that. Alden shoes are indeed made in New England, and they’re sold at high-end retailers all over the world. What makes the San Francisco shop unique is that it is one of only two stores that is directly affiliated with the factory (the other one is in Washington, D.C.). For that reason, it is the biggest - and best - collection of Alden shoes anywhere.
Read More

fromsqualortoballer:

Out & About: The Alden Shop of San Francisco (170 Sutter St.)

There are quite a few clothing stores in downtown San Francisco. Some are common and approachable, like Uniqlo and Macy’s, while others like Nieman Marcus and Wilkes Bashford are only for the true ballers among us. Of course, it should come as no surprise that my favorite store is neither of these things - it is small, unassuming, and focused on doing just one thing but doing it well. It’s something surprisingly unique to the Bay Area, too - the Alden Shop of San Francisco.

I know what you’re thinking: “I thought Alden was a Massachusetts brand! It says ‘New England’ right there in the photo!” Well, you’re not wrong, but it’s a bit more complicated than that. Alden shoes are indeed made in New England, and they’re sold at high-end retailers all over the world. What makes the San Francisco shop unique is that it is one of only two stores that is directly affiliated with the factory (the other one is in Washington, D.C.). For that reason, it is the biggest - and best - collection of Alden shoes anywhere.

Read More

linenforsummertweedforwinter:

gezzaseyes:

A Visit To Tailor Caid

On my last day in Japan, I managed to pay a visit to Tailor Caid in Shibuya, Tokyo. Any fan of menswear owes it to themself to pay this place a visit. Mr Yuhei Yamamoto’s passion for the Ivy style of dress has resulted in this little piece of sartorial splendour. Walk in and it’s like travelling 60 years back in time – Doris Day on the record player, original 1950s and 1960s issues of GQ, Esquire and other menswear magazines and the clothes …

Oh, the clothes! The suits, sportscoats, shirts and trousers are truly something to behold. I spent a very pleasant hour in here talking to Yamamoto-san while he brought out pictures, film stills and magazine articles of Ivy icons one after another – Sinatra, Cary Grant, Anthony Hopkins„ Steve McQueen, excitedly pointed out the various details on the clothing and then brought out virtually identical Tailor Caid-made items. Certain small details – lapel width, notch size might have been changed slightly to cater to modern tastes but aside from that they were identical. These details have been painstaking gleaned from magazine articles, movie stills and books depicting the Ivy style. Even the shirt and jacket labels paid homage to the icons of Ivy – Brooks Brothers and Chipp.

I was thrilled to be asked to try on one of their jackets (the grey piece in the photo) and had I had more time in the country, a commission might have been on the cards. It fit very well and the higher armholes were a very nice touch.

Of course, I had to get a souvenir of my visit and it was to be the tie that I’m wearing in the photo – a classic black silk knit tie that’s thick and with a nice crunch. I will be smiling every time I put it on.

When passion and art meet, something wonderful like Tailor Caid is the result and I am blessed to have been able to spend a little time there with Yamamoto-san. This was my first trip to Japan and certainly will not be the last – a return visit to Tailor Caid will definitely be on the cards.

Our Man in Japan.

(via theselectedfew)